the-real-goddamazon:

curvellas:

keep in mind many men don’t really like women, they like the high regard afforded them by other men when seen with a certain kind of woman. they like the confirmations of their masculinity and sexual prowess when engaging physically with a woman, and they like the ego boost of being attractive to many women. but they do. not. like. women.

And once you understand this, you can immediately tell the difference between men who like women and men who like men reacting to them interacting with women.

I think vagabondaesthetics made a post similar last year about how a lot of these men’s only common bond is talking about how much women suck, or their sexual relationships with women amongst one another. That’s their camaraderie card.

wesschneider:

dogbomber:

Let’s Draw: Lady Knights

Compiled them all into a photoset. The prompts, respectively:1) Fists, Top Heavy, Nervous, Indian, Shark/Piscine
2) Bow, Petite, Honest, Spanish, Boar
3) Staff, Skinny, Evil, Aztec, Insectoid
4) Mace, Bulky, Mischievous, Russian, Big Cat
5) Axe, Short, Glum, Japanese, Snake
6) Sword, Athletic, Bashful, Roman, Bird of Prey
7) Shield, Perky, Plump, English, Rabbit

Another fun exercise! At the moment I’m thinking up another prompt to try. Hopefully it’ll be just as interesting!

Wow wow wow! Particularly LOVE the Aztec!

chelseakenna:

This is an important read for freelancers. I’ve fallen into this trap a LOT lately and it has affected my health.
I’ve since made it a goal to better balance work with the rest of my life. You can’t be productive unless you take care of yourself first.
cuhelski:

saetje-reference:

juliedillon:

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal
We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!
However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 
The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 
The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.
And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

YES. Thank you. It makes me really uncomfortable when I hear professionals saying things like “if you are not drawing 24/7 you’ll never make it”, implying that having outside interests or taking care of yourself means you will fail. You undoubtedly need to be dedicated and focused to succeed as a freelancer, but what is the point of having the so-called freedom that freelancing is supposed to provide you if you can’t even leave your desk every once in a while? Exercise, get outside, socialize, have other hobbies. I’ve found I’m more productive and happier and healthier and more passionate about my work and my career when I take time off, every day, to get away from work for a little while. Building a career is important and rewarding, but your life is not comprised solely of the amount of work you are able do. Your life is not defined solely by how many hours you clock at your work desk. 

This mindset is rampant throughout college and even in the professional studio environments too. It’s so sad, I’ve fallen Ill because of it and still have a hard time breaking away. I see many of my peers ruining their bodies and minds too to live up to an ideal of working 24/7.

It feels really relieving to see I’m not alone in this. The guilt of not always feeling inspired. The frenzy of not wanting to let anyone down (especially yourself) can completely break you down. I’ve been beyond fortunate to have some of the most understanding and compassionate bosses ever, so the idea of the letting them is crushing. One of the most valuable things I’ve learned since I started freelancing is to take time for yourself when you need it. Not “when I’m done with this project in 2 months I’ll relax.” Take care of yourselves artist friends. <3

chelseakenna:

This is an important read for freelancers. I’ve fallen into this trap a LOT lately and it has affected my health.

I’ve since made it a goal to better balance work with the rest of my life. You can’t be productive unless you take care of yourself first.


cuhelski
:

saetje-reference:

juliedillon:

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal

We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!

However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 

The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 

The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.

And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

YES. Thank you. It makes me really uncomfortable when I hear professionals saying things like “if you are not drawing 24/7 you’ll never make it”, implying that having outside interests or taking care of yourself means you will fail. You undoubtedly need to be dedicated and focused to succeed as a freelancer, but what is the point of having the so-called freedom that freelancing is supposed to provide you if you can’t even leave your desk every once in a while? Exercise, get outside, socialize, have other hobbies. I’ve found I’m more productive and happier and healthier and more passionate about my work and my career when I take time off, every day, to get away from work for a little while. Building a career is important and rewarding, but your life is not comprised solely of the amount of work you are able do. Your life is not defined solely by how many hours you clock at your work desk. 

This mindset is rampant throughout college and even in the professional studio environments too. It’s so sad, I’ve fallen Ill because of it and still have a hard time breaking away. I see many of my peers ruining their bodies and minds too to live up to an ideal of working 24/7.

It feels really relieving to see I’m not alone in this. The guilt of not always feeling inspired. The frenzy of not wanting to let anyone down (especially yourself) can completely break you down. I’ve been beyond fortunate to have some of the most understanding and compassionate bosses ever, so the idea of the letting them is crushing. One of the most valuable things I’ve learned since I started freelancing is to take time for yourself when you need it. Not “when I’m done with this project in 2 months I’ll relax.” Take care of yourselves artist friends. <3

"Tiger Lily Doesn’t Equal Human Torch" plus a very long rant

thisfeliciaday:

image

The other day I posted this tweet:

"Wait they cast a white chick for Tiger Lily in the new Peter Pan? Did they not remember Lone Ranger last year? Or, you know, racism?"

(If you didn’t hear, Rooney Mara is supposedly playing Tiger Lily, who is a princess of the “Native” tribe, in the reboot.)

I got tons of Tweets agreeing with me, and then a lot of Tweets like this as well:

"I agree they shouldn’t screw around with classic characters. Oh wait they cast a Black Guy as Human Torch."

"Are you actually retarded? Black men were cast to play Heimdall and the Human Torch, why aren’t you complaining about that?"

Well, no sir, I’m not “retarded.” Thanks for asking. But from the general tone of the responses (most were civil, for the record), seems like there are lot people upset about black people replacing white people in the Marvel Universe. And they consider that issue a valid counter-argument to my comment about Tiger Lily’s casting. (I guess because they think both have “changing canon” in common?) 

I’d like to clear up some stuff here, especially with regards to my initial tweet:

I am not upset about Tiger Lily, a role originally written for a Native American female character in the book, being cast as white because it upsets the canon. Screw canon. I am upset about a role that was expressly written as a female minority being given to white actor instead. And here is why. 

Most lead characters and lead actors of movies are white. Period. I even dug up a recent study to back that up, like this is some fucking term paper or something: Across 100 top-grossing films of 2012, only 10.8% of speaking characters were Black, 4.2% were Hispanic, 5% were Asian, and 3.6% were from other (or mixed race) ethnicities. Just over three-quarters of all speaking characters are White (76.3%). 

(In referring to “speaking characters”, I also assume that’s counting judges and store clerks and taxi drivers with just a line or two. You see a lot of casting stick minority characters to check the boxes of “yeah, we had diversity, look!” So we’re not even talking about opportunities to carry the whole movie here.)

Another thing to note from the study: “These trends are relatively stable, as little deviation is observed across the 5-year sample.” Gee, no movement towards reflecting the country or world we live in! Fantastic. 

Bottom line, actors of ethnicity don’t get a lot of work to begin with. And that very fact creates a scarcity in the number of actors of different ethnicities to choose from when casting. It’s a chicken and the egg syndrome. In what instance can you point out a role where a Native American actress has a chance to be a lead in any movie? Almost none. So why chase a dream that doesn’t seem like it could come true, because the system would never allow it? 

It’s a self-perpetuating reality we live with, so the only way to change it is to break the norm, and cast more leading characters with more diversity. At the very least give roles that are intended to be ethnically diverse to ethnically diverse actors, I mean, BARE MINIMUM, PEOPLE. 

So for me, the opportunity to give a leading role that could be a Native American, a possible protagonist role that the audience could relate to and live the story through, to a white actor, is kind of shitty and backwards to me. And that’s why I posted my initial tweet. 

To compare Tiger Lily being cast as a white women to Human Torch or Heimdall being cast as an African-American is not equivalent, because I don’t think this issue is about violating or adhereing to “lore,” I think it’s about providing more representation. And that’s why I think that the Human Torch being cast as African-American is an awesome thing, because that move evolves Hollywood and storytelling and the Marvel universe. 

Remember in the past, lead characters were most likely written as white in the first place, because they were created in an even more white-centric world. Fantastic Four debuted in 1961, segregation was outlawed in 1964. You can’t say that the culture at large at the time didn’t influence the creator’s choices when making these characters! Fast forward fifty years, the culture at large NOW doesn’t match up with the lore from before, and we should be open to changing it. 

Tiger Lily, in the book, is actually portrayed in an EXTREMELY racist way. But hey, it could be a great opportunity to re-invent the character as a Native American to be proud of, rather than dodge the issue entirely, and take the role away and give it to a white woman. 

Why NOT re-imagine Tiger Lily so that the audience can fall in love with and admire a woman of color? Or reimagine a superhero as an African-American, one among a TON of white ones we see every day? Let’s show the audience that they can live through anyone’s eyes! 

We have to make an effort to change the pattern of only seeing stories through white characters’ points of view, so that in the future, diverse protagonists are just a given. So that we can have heroes and villians and judges and love interests of all backgrounds, and not have to point it out as “look how special this is!” Evolving stories and lore is a GOOD THING FOR OUR WORLD. 

And bottom line, if you feel so disenfranchised by one role out of TONS of roles being changed up ethnically, if you are saying you can’t possibly relate to a character who is another race from you, well, I think that’s more a problem of your own than anything else. But don’t worry, the stastics say you’ll have lots of other entertainment for your point of view to choose from. Around 75%, actually. Hooray, I guess? :/

So yeah, I guess that’s my expansion on my previous 140 character Tweet, haha. Happy weekend!

bridgioto:

pindaboom:

Oscar nominees Best Animated Feature 2014

Earlier today this article was brought to my attention, in which it becomes clear that some of the Academy voters have little to no respect for the animation industry. They openly admit not having watched the nominated films and/or claiming that animated films are for kids, so they didn’t vote. Even the ones shown in the article that did vote barely motivated their choice.

I find this extremely disrespectful of the animators who poured their heart and soul into making these movies, only to have their work be pushed aside without a second glance by the judges of one of the most prominent and well known film awards out there. As an aspiring animator, I am deeply insulted.

Please note that in this post I am expressing no opinion on whether Frozen should have won or not. I think it’s a wonderful film, just as all the other nominees. I am simply saying that we deserve better.

What they did is disrespectful to the creators of every single one of these films, even Frozen. By barely motivating their choice, they make it look like they voted for Frozen simply because of Disney’s status in the industry. Because it’s Disney, and it made a lot of money, so it had to be at least somewhat good. To me it seems like some of the voters just defaulted to voting for the Disney film, and nobody likes to win by default.

Don’t get me wrong, I too have been guilty of loving Disney simply because it’s Disney, but there is so much more beautiful animation out there and it deserves to be taken into consideration. And if Frozen won, it should have won because the majority of the voters thought it was the best film, not because part of the voters was too lazy to even watch the nominated films.

I very rarely reblog here but this sums up a lot of my feelings about the Oscars this year :(

I want so badly to just educate people in film about the real craft of animation. I think so much of the dismissal simply comes from a place of ignorance. It doesn’t hurt any less, but it gives me hope that spreading knowledge will help bring a change in the condescending attitude so many people have towards animation.

The Myth of Credibility

kellysue:

nicksmedulla:

I’ve never had my geek cred questioned. No one asks me if I “actually read this stuff” as I work behind the counter of my LCS. When I say how much I enjoy a book like Ms. Marvel or Wonder Woman, people take me on my word. When I check out a store in another town, I’m asked what series I collect, not what I’m doing there. If only these people knew I wasn’t “one of them”.

I was 19 the first time I ever set foot in a comic book store. I wasn’t even there to buy a “real comic”, instead leaving with the first two volumes of Scott Pilgrim. It took two years for me to actually set up my first subscription, for the then newly announced Adventure Time. I was late to the party on Saga, Hawkeye, Captain Marvel, Ultimate Spider-Man - books that are now some of my favorites - and I’d never read an issue of Batman until I was working in a comic shop. If I were held to the same standard half the comic reading population is, I’d be branded as a fake.

Instead, I’m seen as an expert by the customers of my store, in equal parts it seems because of my position and gender. When someone brings up a series I am unfamiliar with I can deflect with a simple “let me check if we have that in” and no one questions if I know what I’m doing. People want and take my suggestions of what to read, even though I was the one receiving those same recommendations just a year or two ago. While my job has afforded me the opportunity to catch up on many of the “classics”, I’ve still not gotten through much of the Marvel and DC catalog. Instead I sometimes have to rely on what I know from Wikipedia pages and secondhand accounts. There’s a part of me that is always concerned I’ll be called out as a fake, but in reality, it’s unlikely to ever happen. I get to be a part of the club because I look the part.

I’ll be going to my very first convention in March with a friend who has read comics her entire life. She actually understands exactly what happened in the New 52 continuity shift and can tell you how the plot of the Avengers movie mirrors the original Stan Lee and Jack Kirby issues. If she were a guy, she’d be considered a true fan by any standard. But when she goes to a store, she gets one of two reactions. Either she’ll just be ignored, which at this point she prefers, or she’ll be subjected to a series of increasingly difficult trivia questions, trying to prove her assumed ignorance. A Batman backpack and Wonder Woman key-chain she carries with her every day aren’t enough to convince someone she’s a fan. No one asks here about her opinions on DC’s handling of Cassandra Cain and Stephanie Brown. Instead she’s asked if she’s there to get something for a boyfriend. At every turn her credibility is questioned.

This entire idea of “credibility”, however, is the real problem. The biggest lie at the center of the “fake geek girl” phenomena is that there are legitimate and illegitimate ways to enjoy comics. Regardless of gender, someone who has only seen the Marvel movies and someone who has all 700 issues of Amazing Spider-Man are both justified in calling themselves comic fans. There shouldn’t be rankings; there shouldn’t be tiers. If you prefer Tomine or Liefeld or Staples;
big two or independents; collecting variants or buying during Comixology sales - none of that should matter. The diversity of this amazing medium is reflected in the unique way each person approaches it and chooses to enjoy it. I’m not suggesting that some people aren’t more passionate about comics than others, but passion = interest + time. By excluding people as they’re just starting out, we’re not giving them a chance to let their passion for comics develop.

We need to work to dismantle this idea of credibility whenever we get the chance and catch ourselves when we’re buying into it. If you’ve ever felt superior to someone else because you knew more about comics, I want you to really think about what you gained from it. Instead of bragging about what you know, share something new with someone who doesn’t. Be the person you wish you’d met when you read your first comic. Remember we all start somewhere and invite someone new to our club.

Be the person you wish you’d met when you read your first comic,” he says.  

I love that as a fandom credo. 

elk64-sketch:

Hello, I have no choice than ask support from my watcher. My digital painting “overlapping the twilight” got copied by a russian painter that is selling it (and print as well if I understood well) over 1000€ (~1400$). The person refuse to respond to us, and delete all the message about this illegal copy. ALSO, I’M NOT THE ONLY ARTIST BEING PLAGIARISED, there’s ton of painting, and I’m sure you’ll reconize someone else’s art too&#160;! If you know the original artist, contact him please&#160;!http://www.livemaster.ru/item/4418835-kartiny-panno-kartina-maslom-letayuschayathe original one&#160;: http://elk64.deviantart.com/art/Overlapping-the-twilight-368166865HOW TO HELP&#160;?This mean the website is in russian, but you can help me! You can connect to the site via fb, the log part is in top right part of the site(you can also use google translate). Then you can post a comment ("Комментировать") that is next to the buy icon, you can send a mp to the art thief here&#160;: www.livemaster.ru/oikos/contact , and also REPORT TO THE ADMIN HERE&#160;: http://www.livemaster.ru/questions/theme/31 . Don’t get it wrong, Copying paintings is a great way to practice but you DON’T HAVE THE RIGHT TO SELL COPIED ART! It’s ART THIEF! It’s not even inspired or a reintepretation, it’s a vulgar copy of it, and the autor is trying to get profit, and refuse to act as a responsible adult by ignoring our message. The painter only says that the painting was inspired by “oriental fantasy childbook”, my ass&#160;!  PLEASE HELP ME, AND IF YOU KNOW ANY OTHER ARTIST PLAGIARIZED, SPREAD THE MESSAGE. THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT. I’ll be editing the journal with a tumblr and a facebook link, so you can share and spread the message, the more we are, the more  luck we will have to stop this.

elk64-sketch:

Hello, I have no choice than ask support from my watcher.

My digital painting “overlapping the twilight” got copied by a russian painter that is selling it (and print as well if I understood well) over 1000€ (~1400$). The person refuse to respond to us, and delete all the message about this illegal copy. ALSO, I’M NOT THE ONLY ARTIST BEING PLAGIARISED, there’s ton of painting, and I’m sure you’ll reconize someone else’s art too ! If you know the original artist, contact him please !

http://www.livemaster.ru/item/4418835-kartiny-panno-kartina-maslom-letayuschaya

the original one : http://elk64.deviantart.com/art/Overlapping-the-twilight-368166865

HOW TO HELP ?

This mean the website is in russian, but you can help me! You can connect to the site via fb, the log part is in top right part of the site(you can also use google translate). Then you can post a comment ("Комментировать") that is next to the buy icon, you can send a mp to the art thief here : www.livemaster.ru/oikos/contact , and also REPORT TO THE ADMIN HERE : http://www.livemaster.ru/questions/theme/31 .

Don’t get it wrong, Copying paintings is a great way to practice but you DON’T HAVE THE RIGHT TO SELL COPIED ART! It’s ART THIEF! It’s not even inspired or a reintepretation, it’s a vulgar copy of it, and the autor is trying to get profit, and refuse to act as a responsible adult by ignoring our message. The painter only says that the painting was inspired by “oriental fantasy childbook”, my ass ! 

PLEASE HELP ME, AND IF YOU KNOW ANY OTHER ARTIST PLAGIARIZED, SPREAD THE MESSAGE. THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT.

I’ll be editing the journal with a tumblr and a facebook link, so you can share and spread the message, the more we are, the more  luck we will have to stop this.